ARRL VEC Conducts Another Antarctic Test Session

By qrznow

GB 8elm70cm+6elm 144MHz Quad

The ARRL VEC conducted its seventh Amateur Radio exam session in Antarctica earlier this month, with everything monitored remotely from ARRL Headquarters via Skype and a satellite connection. The session on August 3 at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station — home to KC4AAA — was the largest of its type that ARRL VEC has conducted, ARRL VEC Manager Maria Somma, AB1FM, said. Twelve examinees took 32 exams.

“The station’s winter population is 46 people,” Somma said. “Since 11 people passed the exam(s) and obtained licenses, this means that we have 12 people on station — including the VE — that will have licenses. That’s more than a quarter of the South Pole station’s population!”

Somma reported that two examinees earned Amateur Extra tickets, while three got their General licenses, and six passed the Technician exam. James Casey, AI4LX, served as the volunteer examiner (VE) at the South Pole, while Somma and Perry Green, WY1O, were the VEs at ARRL Headquarters.

When the session took place, it was noon Eastern Time at ARRL Headquarters but 4 AM the next day at the South Pole.

“That was the best time for them because the time they have is limited by their satellite access,” Somma explained. “Their ‘good’ satellite (i.e., the satellite that will actually have enough bandwidth for Skype) goes down at about 6:30 AM local. So we had to be done with the video session by then.”

In July of 2014, the ARRL VEC proctored the first exam session in Antarctica, taking advantage of the then brand-new FCC rules that permitting VECs to administer Amateur Radio examinations remotely. — Thanks to ARRL VEC Manager Maria Somma, AB1FM

Source:ARRL

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ARRL VEC Conducts Another Antarctic Test Session

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AMSAT Reports RadFxSat (Fox-1B) Completes P-POD Integration

By qrznow

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AMSAT Vice President Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, on August 15 delivered RadFxSat (Fox-1B) CubeSat, built in partnership with Vanderbilt University to Cal Poly University. RadFsSat/Fox-1B was successfully integrated into the P-POD CubeSat deployment container on August 16 along with its pod-mates, Makersat-0 and EagleSat.

Launch qualification vibration testing of the integrated P-POD was completed on August 17. The P-POD will next be mounted on the ULA Delta II rocket for launch no earlier than October 12.

“Many thanks to the Cal Poly, Tyvak, and NASA personnel who we performed the integration with, to the Makersat-0 and EagleSat team members, and to my west coast AMSAT CubeSat wing man Al Vasso for a successful and fun day!” Buxton said afterward.

Uplink for Fox-1B is 435.250 MHz FM (67.0 Hz CTCSS); Downlink is 145.960 MHz FM (with subaudible slow speed telemetry data); 145.960 MHz 9600 baud FSK data. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service via Jerry Buxton, N0JY

SOURCE:ARRL

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How does the solar eclipse affect Ham Radios?

By qrznow

Compact D-Star Transceiver, Icom ID-31 upgraded!

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Many ham radio operators are excited for the upcoming solar eclipse. “This is my first chance of being a part of a total solar eclipse,” ham operator Ben Lowe said

The upcoming eclipse is something he’s been dreaming about for a while. His father used to share stories with him about how amazing they are. “He told me about seeing that last eclipse 99 years ago, so he would have been five years old at the time,” Lowe explained.

Now that he’s an adult, he will be paying close attention to it. “This solar eclipse is providing a unique opportunity for the hams to measure the effects of the eclipse on the ionosphere propagation,” Lowe said….READ MORE

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Canada Proposes Implementing a 60-Meter Band While Retaining Discrete Channels

By qrznow

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An Industry Canada (IC) regulatory consultation (proceeding) aimed at implementing the changes from the 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) could lead to the allocation of a 60-meter band in Canada in addition to the five discrete channels that are congruent with those in the US. IC is seeking comments on this and other revisions that take WRC-15 into account.

“The consultation is the first step in the process for regulatory changes,” International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 2 Area A Director George Gorsline, VE3YV, explained. “After the 60-day period, responses are tabulated, made public and the regulator then determines how to proceed.” Gorsline said there is no fixed schedule before any allocation changes would be made. Even then, he added, Canada’s Amateur Radio regulations would have to be updated to incorporate them before the new allocation would became available for amateur use.

As the Consultation notes, a number of countries have authorized, subject to various restrictions, operation by Amateur radio licensees within the 5,250-5,450 kHz frequency range. “To date, no interference has been reported,” IC said in the consultation. “Ultimately, a world-wide, secondary allocation of 15 kHz in the frequency band 5,351.5-5,366.5 kHz was made to the Amateur Service with an effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) limit of 15 W” in most of Region 2. “The proposed changes to the Canadian Table [of Allocations] will allow Canadian Amateur Radio operators to assist in domestic and international emergency or disaster‑relief situations,” IC said.

The regulator proposed retaining the five discrete channels already available to radio amateurs — 5,332, 5,348, 5,358.5, 5,373, and 5,405 kHz. ARRL has petitioned the FCC to allocate the same contiguous band — 5,351.5-5,366.5 kHz — to US radio amateurs with a 100 W PEP power limit, while also retaining the five discrete 60-meter channels that have been available for several years.

“I hope this may be helpful to us to use as an example to other IARU Region 2 countries to convince them to both keep any existing 60-meter domestic allocation and add the ITU allocation as well,” Gorsline said in a Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) bulletin, released on August 19. Gorsline is RAC’s International Affairs Officer.

Source:ARRL


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Station Damage – 4O3A

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No comments

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Oklahoma QSL Card Bureau

By noreply@blogger.com (Lloyd Colston)

A draft of new rules were explained at the Ham Holiday OKDXA meeting regarding changing the envelopes and postage. I received an envelope this week with the following information:

#1) Effective Sept 1, 2017 the W5 Incoming buro must be self supporting and they are no longer accepting SASE’s from users. Instead you can simply send money and they will print your envelopes with postage for you. Send $20 (anything beyond the $20 will be considered a donation to cover other buro related expenses.)

You can send money via PayPal:
PayPay (send money to a friend – to w5buro@gmail.com)

Or by USPS:
W5 INCOMING BUREAU
P.O. BOX 1060
Mounds OK 74047

Please make sure your callsign is evident by either method used.

#2) Rates are increasing to $1.00 per envelope to keep up with increasing postage expenses, miscellaneous supplies and printing. The $20 you send will provide for 20 envelopes and any additional funds you send will be considered a donation toward general bureau expenses (like a PO box and other things!) If you want a 2 or 3 ounces per mailing please make sure to provide your sorter with a batch of “Additional Ounce” (penguin) stamps to keep on file for you.

If your a high-volume user, such as a DX Expeditioner or a high-scoring contestor you may want many ounces per mailing. One envelope with a single forever stamp will carry about 6 cards. With the “Additional Ounce” postage it can transport about 12 to 14 cards.

#3) Everyone is reminded to contact the sorter for their callsign directly with questions or comments. If you are unable to resolve a concern then you are welcome to contact the W5 Incomming Bureau Manager, Gene Lewis, W5LE. Gene is available at w5buro@gmail.com

#4) Expect to see a strong push in the coming months by ARRL for all incoming bureaus to become self-sustaining.

—————-
If your wondering what this is all about: The ARRL offers a service to members that drastically reduces the cost of sending QSL cards overseas. You fill out your cards then mail a envelope full of them along with payment and they will forward the cards on to the overseas bureaus in bulk. Those bureaus will send them using their local postal system. This service alone justifies the ARRL membership dues if you send very many! You can read more here: http://www.arrl.org/outgoing-qsl-service

Thanks to the Edmond Amateur Radio Society for this information.

Source:: ARRL Oklahoma

Tulsa Public Service Events

If you are interested in helping with public service events there are 3 opportunities coming up.

  1. Maple Ridge Run – May 26th – This is a 5k fun run in the Maple Ridge Neighborhood. A handheld is all you need all positions are
    stationary. We meet at 26th and Owasso at 6:00am. If this is your first event we will pair you with an experienced operator. You will finish by noon. Sponsored by TRO
    Contact Tom Stroud – KD5OPH@Tulsahamradio.org
  2. Tour de Cure – May 31 – This an all day bike ride. We meet at Hillcrest South Hospital, 191st and 169, around 6:30am. Our responsibility to to see that everyone makes it back to the start/finish. We sag between rest
    stops and sweep the course and help with safety. This year we will carry
    a medic in each sag vehicle. Mobile radios are a must . If this is your first event we will pair you with an experienced operator. We start early and some stay late. We also use APRS to track the sags. You will be reimbersed for your fuel. We need 10-12 operators. Snacks are available on the course. Sponsored by TRO
    Contact Tom Stroud –
    KD5OPH@Tulsahamradio.org or me at benj1@aol.com

    If you decide at the last minute, come on out.

  3. Tulsa Tough – June 7-8. This is 2 days of all day bike rides. Our responsibility is to see that everyone makes it back to the start/finish. We sag between rest stops, sweep the course and help with safety. This is the 5th largest event of its kind in the US and the largest of its kind in OK. It has grown to the point that a race management team is coming to help. Day 1 goes south and west of Kellyville and Kiefer and north to just west of Sperry. Day 2 goes north as far as Ochelata and Barnsdall.
    We can use 15-18 operators for each day. Mobile radios are a must. We may
    have some stations at rest stops. A handheld with a good antenna may work there. We can use you all or part of a day, one or both days. You will be reimbursed for your fuel.

    Each day starts around 6:30am and some stay as late as 7:00pm.
    Snacks are available on the course.
    There is a real emphasis on APRS this year. This is avery good opportunity to see how it

works.
Sponsored by TARC
You need to register with Tulsa Tough for safety, legal reasons and a t-shirt. To register:

Go to www.tulsatough.com
click on “get involved’
click on “volunteer”
click on “sign up now”
Scroll down to ‘Ham Radio Operator” sign up for one or both days.

If you decide at the last minute, come on out.
If you have trouble with the web site contact me at .
benj1@aol.com

Ben Joplin, WB5VST
Zone 5 Emergency Coordinator
Amateur Radio Emergency Service-Oklahoma 918-639-2853 Cell
918-396-1651 Home
benj1@aol.com
www.ARESOK.org

All Ham Dinner

hamAll ham dinner is this month! Visit with friend talk about our hobby and hear some great information about what is being done with amateur radio in our community.

This All Ham Dinner will be at Golden Corral just off I-240 on South Side on Thursday May 8th 2014 @ 6:00pm.

 

Do you need to know how to get there? CLICK HERE